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Self-rescue to safe areas after accident

Road users can remove themselves to safe areas in the tunnel until emergency personnel arrive.

If there is an accident, road users in the Fehmarnbelt tunnel should easily be able to get themselves to safety until the rescue and emergency personal arrive to help. Femern A/S has optimised the tunnel design to make self-rescue fast and efficient.

There will be a connection between the five tunnel tubes. This will offer a good means of escape and will make it easy for people in the tunnel to reach safety. Rescue personnel will also be able to enter via a tube that is unaffected by the incident and through emergency doors begin fire-fighting and evacuation.

The most important aspect for self-rescue is the distance to the nearest emergency exit. Emergency exits between the five tunnel tubes will be located at approximately 100 metre intervals, a shorter distance than actually required by authorities and standards. No matter where in the tunnel an accident occurs, there will therefore be a very short route to an escape door to a safe area in one of the adjacent tunnel tubes.

In the road tubes, drivers will be informed through information boards, loudspeakers and radio. If the situation is serious, everyone will be asked to immediately leave their vehicle and exit through the nearest emergency door into the central corridor between the road tubes. They will able to remain safe there until the adjacent road tube is cleared of traffic, and emergency personnel arrive.

In the rail tunnel tubes, train staff will be responsible for passenger evacuation to the nearest safe tube until rescue personnel arrive. This can take place via one of the walkways, which are on both sides of the rail track in each tube.  

The connection between all five tunnel tubes – the two tubes for road traffic, the two for rail traffic, as well as the tube with the central service corridor between the road tubes – offers extra safety.

As a combined road and rail tunnel, the Fehmarnbelt link has an additional built-in, safety feature: if an incident occurs in one of the railway tubes that forces a train has to stop, it will be easier and faster to evacuate passengers – and for the emergency services to conduct a rescue operation – via the nearest road tubes than it would have been in a conventional dual-tube railway tunnel with no road access. 


EMERGENCY EXITS BETWEEN THE FIVE TUNNEL TUBES WILL BE LOCATED AT APPROXIMATELY 100 METRE INTERVALS. THIS IS A CONSIDERABLY SHORTER DISTANCE THAN AUTHORITIES AND STANDARDS REQUIRE.