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Focus on the environment

The Fehmarnbelt project will be undertaken with the greatest possible respect for nature and the environment. This applies both during the construction work and the operation of the finished tunnel. Femern A/S, therefore, is fully committed to complying with all environmental requirements.

Comprehensive environmental studies

Over the past 5-6 years, around 150 internationally renowned biologists, geographers, landscape planners and engineers have, on behalf of Femern A/S, studied how a tunnel under the Fehmarnbelt will affect the environment. As a cross-border project, the company is required to take German, Danish and European environmental legislation into consideration. 

Fehmarnbelt tunnel is environmentally-friendly 

The conclusion of the environmental studies is clear: the establishment of an immersed tunnel under the Fehmarnbelt is sound as far as the environment and nature conservation are concerned. Neither the extensive construction works nor the permanent presence of the tunnel and its operation will result in significant temporary or permanent impairment with regard to porpoises and seals, bird and bat migration, plankton, fish or resting birds. 

THE PLANNING OF THE FEHMARNBELT TUNNEL DRAWS ON THE EXPERIENCE FROM THE FIXED LINKS ACROSS STOREBÆLT AND ØRESUND

Did you know that...

... the environmental investigations are the most comprehensive ever for a Danish transport infrastructure project? 

... reports on the environmental studies fill more than 16,000 pages?

... in almost all study areas, German, Danish and international experts collaborated in joint ventures?

Nature and soil replaced

The planning of the Fehmarnbelt tunnel will draw on the experience from the fixed links across Storebælt and Øresund, which showed that negative environmental impacts can be avoided through the careful planning and implementation of construction work. 

Unavoidable impacts, such as the seizure of agricultural land and natural areas on water and on land will be counterbalanced through a variety of preventive measures and ultimately compensated in accordance with prevailing legislation. In southern Lolland, the affected natural areas will, for example, be replaced under current legislation at the ratio of at least 1:2.